Jerusalem artichoke / Topinambur

Jerusalem artichoke / Topinambur

Helianthus tuberosus

Plant family

Korbblütler (Asteraceae) (Asteraceae)

Synonyms

Sunroot, Sunchoke, Wild Sunflower, Earth Apple

Season Overview

Sowing

Harvest

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

Details

Light requirement

Sunny

Water requirement

Wet

Soil

Medium (loamy)

Nutrient requirement

High

Seeding distance

60 cm

Row spacing

50 cm

Seeding depth

10 cm

Instructions

End of May

Sowing

Description

Botanically, Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) belongs to the composite family (Asteraceae). The inflorescences resemble those of a sunflower.

Origin:

North and Central America

Growing tips

Normally Jerusalem artichoke is cultivated as an annual. It is unpretentious and does not make great demands on its location, and even nutrient-poor soils can be used. Very well it follows in the crop rotation on crops that leave a loose soil. Waterlogging should be avoided. Jerusalem artichoke appreciates sunny locations, but it is just as comfortable in partial shade. During very early planting, young Jerusalem artichoke plants can be covered with fleece to speed up sprouting. The tubers are placed at a depth of 10 to 12 cm. In principle, the same cultivation technique can be used as for potatoes. That is, the rows are mounded to accelerate the sprouting of the tubers and facilitate their later harvesting. When the leaves fall (collapse), the tubers have reached harvest maturity. To harvest, pull the tubers out of the ground by the stem or carefully dig them up with a garden shovel. Jerusalem artichoke tubers are extremely hardy and can withstand even severe frosts in the ground. Therefore, overwintering with subsequent harvesting in the next spring (before new shoots!) is also possible. To be able to harvest even during frost, the soil should be covered with straw or leaves. Jerusalem artichoke can be grown for several years in the same location.

Companion Plants

No companion plants

Diseases

Downy Mildew

Sunflower Rust

Black Spot Disease

Powdery Mildew

Pests

Snails