Chard

Chard

Beta vulgaris subsp. vulgaris

Plant family

Goosefoot family (Chenopodiaceae)

Season Overview

Propagating

Planting

Harvest

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

Details

Light requirement

Semi-shaded

Water requirement

Very humid

Soil

Light (sandy)

Nutrient requirement

Medium

Seeding distance

30 cm

Row spacing

40 cm

Seeding depth

1 cm

Instructions

Beginning of June

Weeding

Every week

Description

Biennial goosefoot with two groups of varieties: stem or ribbed chard and leaf or cut chard. Stem chard forms a very large leaf vein that can be prepared like asparagus. Leafy chard forms a much smaller leaf vein, but large leaves that can be used like spinach or raw as a salad ingredient when young.

Origin:

Coastal regions of the Mediterranean

Growing tips

When sowing chard is happy humus and nutrient-rich soil, and then should be kept moist. After germination, it is recommended to remove seedlings that grow too densely. Chard tolerates light frost and can remain outdoors in regions with mild winters. Leafy chard can be harvested continuously from about 2 months after sowing, stem chard after about 3 months. If only the outer leaves are removed and the plant is watered, the chard will grow again. A cultivation interval of 3-4 years to other goosefoot should be observed.

Diseases

Downy Mildew

Pests

Turnip Fly

Aphids

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